Tag Archives: wpc 2010 science

Notes from a Day Spent Listening to Scientists Judging PDF Research Applications

Last Friday, March 16, was the occasion for reviewing applications for PDF’s International Research Grants program and Research Fellowships programs. Before us were some 30 proposals from some of the best young (and not-so-young) scientific investigators in the world. As I sat there in the meeting as an observer, listening to the members of our scientific review committee as they made their comments and pronounced their judgments, I found myself scribbling notes on what seemed to be the principles on which they were basing their decisions. What they were saying, it seemed to me, said a lot about how we… read more Read More

WPC Roving Reporters: Day Two Science

The 2nd World Parkinson Congress continues its three days of sessions discussing the latest news in Parkinson’s science and care. PDF’s reporters have been listening in to a variety of these sessions. They are reporting back what they have seen and heard….and sharing the most important messages they are hearing as people living with Parkinson’s. Please note that this post was updated on October 5. Kate Kelsall Attended: Music as Pleasure and How It Can Empower YouPresenter: Concetta (Connie) Tomaino, D.A., MT-BC, LCAT, Executive Director of the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function in the Bronx, New York “Some of… read more Read More

WPC Science Day Two: Genetics Updates

From James Beck, Ph.D., Director of Research Programs Here are some additional scientific updates from this week’s 2nd World Parkinson Congress (WPC). Michael Schlossmacher, M.D., reported the results of his recent experiments that demonstrate that mutations in the GBA gene, which were recently identified as a major risk factor for Parkinson’s disease (PD), actually contribute to an increase in the levels of alpha-synuclein in nerve cells. Alpha-synuclein is the protein that accumulates in dying nerve cells and is the hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. This result provides a biological explanation as to the significance of these GBA mutations and their relevance… read more Read More

WPC Science Day Zero: Orthostatic Hypotension

From James Beck, Ph.D., Director of Research Programs Yesterday, an industry-sponsored session for clinicians and scientists was held prior to the official start of 2nd World Parkinson Congress. Largely a review of current medical management of PD, the session included one tidbit that I found particularly interesting – a comment made by Mark Stacy, M.D. He said that orthostatic hypotension, that is low blood pressure upon standing, is the most common, unrecognized symptom of PD. Up to 40 percent of people with PD experience orthostatic hypotension. Drugs that are currently approved to treat hypotension, like midodrine, work, but may work… read more Read More