Tag Archives: Parkinson’s treatments

Back to Basics: Why Basic Research (and the Fava Bean) are Key to the Cure

Do you hope for new treatments for PD? At the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, we do. In fact, it’s the reason we exist. But how do we find them? And would you believe me if I told you the fava bean played an important role in the current gold-standard treatment for PD? When we think of finding better PD treatments, we often think of clinical trials — the final stage of research before PD drugs come to market. But there’s a crucial step at the very beginning of the pipeline that makes new drugs possible — basic science. Basic science looks… read more Read More

DBS in Primetime: NatGeo to Air Brain Surgery Live This Sunday

Have you or has a loved one undergone deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson’s disease (PD)? Would you undergo the surgery on live television? That’s what is happening on Sunday, October 25 as deep brain stimulation surgery for PD makes its primetime debut on the National Geographic Channel at 9:00 PM ET. Greg Grindley, a 49-year-old father of four living with young onset PD, will undergo the procedure at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, OH, as cameras roll and viewers at home get an up-close look at the brain in real-time.

Et Tu Nilotinib?: Understanding Headlines about an Anti-Cancer Drug for PD

The Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, which took place last week in Chicago, IL, is a place where the latest preliminary data in neuroscience is presented. True to form, there was an interesting abstract presented by Fernando Pagan, M.D. and colleagues from Georgetown University Hospital which suggested a potential treatment for those with Parkinson’s disease (PD). At the heart of the presentation, Dr. Pagan and colleagues reported that in a small trial, an anti-cancer drug called nilotinib was able to reverse both the movement symptoms and cognitive decline of people with PD involved in the study.

Guest Blog: Stroke Story Has Implications for Parkinson’s Treatment

Therapy is most effective when it addresses an individual’s passion  By Ken AidekmanPaul West is a professor of English and comparative literature and a prodigious writer of both fiction and non-fiction books. His entire life revolves around words. But, in 2003 he suffered a massive stroke that left him with global aphasia, a condition that rendered him unable to understand words or produce them. His wife, Diane Ackerson, also an author and poet, tells the story of West’s bumpy road to recovery in her book One Hundred Names for Love. Upon his emergence from critical care, West was faced with… read more Read More