Tag Archives: parkinson’s research

Back to Basics: New Drug for Dyskinesias in Clinical Trials

Do you or a loved one experience dyskinesias as part of Parkinson’s disease (PD)? The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) has exciting news that may affect those of you who experience levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs), the twisting and writhing movements that occur when people take levodopa. A few months ago, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted orphan drug status to an experimental PD medication called eltoprazine, which is designed to ease LIDs. This status acknowledges that the drug fills an important unmet need (if approved, it would be the first drug available to treat LIDs) and may allow the drug to become available… read more Read More

Celebrating Spring to Benefit Parkinson’s, Boston Edition: A Q&A with Rehana Ashraf

Rehana Ashraf and her partners-in-planning Kate Evans and Anne Greene, are focused on getting young Bostonians involved in the Parkinson’s cause. In fact, in part to honor their own loved ones affected by the disease, next month they are hosting their fourth annual Celebrate Spring Boston to benefit PDF on Friday, April 24, building on previous years’ successes. The festive evening features cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and dancing. Over the past few years, the women have used PDF’s New York event of the same name as a blueprint for success, raising more than $130,000. In the interview below, find out why… read more Read More

PAIRed Research Into Mood Disorders in PD: Q&A with Dr. Stark-Inbar

Did you know that anxiety and depression are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD)? Both of these fall under the umbrella of mood disorders. But despite being common in PD, they often go undiagnosed (or incorrectly diagnosed) and under-treated. By combining forces, a scientist-patient advocate team involving Alit Stark-Inbar, Ph.D., at UC Berkeley and Ronnie Wanetick, a PDF Research Advocate, is finding solutions. The two received a PDF PAIR Leadership Award to study EMOTE, an iPad app that can help to monitor depression and anxiety throughout the day, and even offers games to help ease symptoms. While the app is still… read more Read More

Aspirin for Parkinson’s: What Does It Mean?

Can an aspirin a day treat Parkinson’s disease (PD)? Not exactly, but the idea made headlines a few weeks ago, after scientists discovered that a key ingredient of aspirin might have potential to block the loss of brain cells in neurological diseases like PD and Alzheimer’s. As with every science headline, PDF asks, “what does it mean for people with PD?” In this case, we asked Michael Schwarzschild, M.D., Ph.D., of MassGeneral Institute of Neurodegenerative Disease, a well-known PD scientist who has also studied aspirin and ibuprofen in relation to PD. Here are his insights.

From Dr. Levy: 2x Your Donation to the Team Ending PD

I’m a scientist and a doctor. Because of funding from the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, I’m spending my career as a member of the team ending PD. But we need your help. As a young neurologist, PDF’s investment in my two-year fellowship — and its annual investment in my fellow research leaders in the amount of $4.6 million — enabled me and others to join the team fighting PD. But we need your donation to help us meet our goal of ending the disease. When you donate by Thursday, December 31st, your donation will be doubled by the PDF Board of Directors… read more Read More

Et Tu Nilotinib?: Understanding Headlines about an Anti-Cancer Drug for PD

The Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, which took place last week in Chicago, IL, is a place where the latest preliminary data in neuroscience is presented. True to form, there was an interesting abstract presented by Fernando Pagan, M.D. and colleagues from Georgetown University Hospital which suggested a potential treatment for those with Parkinson’s disease (PD). At the heart of the presentation, Dr. Pagan and colleagues reported that in a small trial, an anti-cancer drug called nilotinib was able to reverse both the movement symptoms and cognitive decline of people with PD involved in the study.