Blog Archives: Research

LIVE from the 4th World Parkinson Congress (Day 2)

What happens when thousands of people touched by Parkinson’s disease get together? That’s exactly what’s happening at the 4th World Parkinson Congress (WPC) in Portland, OR, where a record 4,500 people PD, care partners, researchers, and health professionals from around the globe have gathered to advance treatments and a cure. The answer? A lot happens. The WPC is chock full of educational seminars, scientific sessions, roundtables, poster presentations, music performances, exercise, yoga and more. The hardest part is choosing where to go. Here’s an update on what the PDF team saw and did on day 2 (Wednesday).

LIVE from the 4th World Parkinson Congress (Day 1, Part I)

This week, the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation is on site at the 4th World Parkinson Congress (WPC) in Portland, OR. Our team of 100 staff, patient advocates and PDF-supported researchers and health professionals joins more than 4,000 delegates from around the globe who are all working toward the same goal: a world without Parkinson’s. Each day, we’ll bring reports to you. Yesterday (Tuesday) was a pre-congress day before the formal program had begun, but it kicked off in full force! Here is what our team saw and heard.

Nurse Faculty Scholars to Join PDF Team at 4th World Parkinson Congress

Are you planning to attend the 4th World Parkinson Congress (WPC) in Portland, OR? This global event brings together people with Parkinson’s, care partners, scientists and health professionals. PDF will be there from Tuesday, September 20 through Friday September 23 with members of our team working to end Parkinson’s — leaders in research, health care and the patient community. We are excited that the PDF team includes 15 of our talented nurse educators — all Scholars from The Edmond J. Safra Visiting Nurse Faculty Program at PDF. Many of our nurse Scholars are presenting posters on their research to advance PD… read more Read More

Managing Constipation in PD: Visiting Nurse Notes with Dr. Jean MacFadyen

Is constipation the most disabling symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD)? It may be surprising, but many people with PD report to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) that the most bothersome aspects of their disease aren’t tremor or stiffness, but instead are nonmotor symptoms such as constipation and fatigue. Luckily, researchers are starting to better understand these symptoms and nurses such as Jean S. MacFadyen, Ph.D., R.N., a 2011 Scholar of The Edmond J. Safra Visiting Nurse Faculty Program (EJS-VNF) at PDF are helping people with Parkinson’s to learn about and manage them. We sat down with Dr. MacFadyen to learn about her experience… read more Read More

Can Occupational and Physical Therapy Help in Early Parkinson’s?

Earlier this year, a controversial study about physical and occupational therapy and Parkinson’s disease (PD) was published in JAMA Neurology. In contrast to other scientific studies, which have found both types of therapy to be beneficial for people with PD, this one found that the therapies were not. Why is there a discrepancy? Many health leaders expressed concern that the study wasn’t a good measurement, both because it only involved a “low dose” program (just four sessions over the course of two months) and because the  sessions didn’t offer “best practice” therapy. What’s the real story about physical therapy (PT)… read more Read More

Back to Basics: New Drug for Dyskinesias in Clinical Trials

Do you or a loved one experience dyskinesias as part of Parkinson’s disease (PD)? The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) has exciting news that may affect those of you who experience levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs), the twisting and writhing movements that occur when people take levodopa. A few months ago, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted orphan drug status to an experimental PD medication called eltoprazine, which is designed to ease LIDs. This status acknowledges that the drug fills an important unmet need (if approved, it would be the first drug available to treat LIDs) and may allow the drug to become available… read more Read More