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ADA Turns 25: Reflecting on How the Americans with Disabilities Act Protects the PD Community

Parkinson’s may limit some physical abilities, but it should never take away a person’s right to live well. Thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA),  it is much less likely to do so. As we mark the 25th birthday of the ADA — which was signed into law by President George H.W. Bush, on July 26, 1990 — we revisit why it is important for the PD community, including how it can protect you and your family and how to contact PDF for help if it doesn’t. The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on… read more Read More

What about the Symptoms We Can’t See? Diane & Scientists Discuss ‘Invisible Faces of PD’

Do you find that your ‘invisible’ symptoms — the ones that people can’t see like sleep issues or dizziness — are the ones that bother you the most? Many people with PD say this is the case, but just 15 years ago, this wasn’t widely known. The good news is that this past April, a group of scientists got together to speak about these symptoms at a meeting, “Non-motor Symptoms: Unraveling the Invisible Faces of Parkinson’s Disease,” hosted by the New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) in New York, NY. The better news? Diane Cook, a person with PD, and… read more Read More

One in 43 Million: What Can PD Caregivers Learn from AARP’s Report?

Are you a care partner to someone living with Parkinson’s? You are not alone. In fact, PD care partners may have some experiences in common with 43 million other Americans who also help to care for loved ones. This information was shared last week, when the AARP joined with the National Alliance for Caregiving to report on the state of caregiving in the US. Together the groups reported on results from a nationwide survey which included responses from 1,250 caregivers who specifically care for adults living with a variety of illnesses such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. What did we learn… read more Read More

From A.C.: Thanking Dad by Giving Back

As Father’s Day comes closer, I have been reflecting on what my Dad gave to me. A US Navy veteran, my Dad was proud of his 37-year career. He served his country as a seaman in World War II and later as an officer. That’s one reason why his diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease – an incurable, chronic and progressive disease – hit him so hard. Although he’s gone, one of the many values he taught me was to be a part of something bigger than self … to serve others … to give back.

Putting Passion to Work for PD: Q&A with PDF Champion Dawn Judson

How are you putting your passions to work for Parkinson’s? Each year, PDF Champion Dawn Judson puts her passion for offroading and and for her business, Bikini Offroad, to use by hosting Shake, Rattle and Crawl. The two-day off-road vehicle event is held in Marble, TX to benefit PDF. The event offers drives on jeeps, ATVs, motorcycles and trucks on the scenic trails and hills of the Hidden Falls Adventure Park, as well as live music, a scavenger hunt, a raffle and dinner. This year, Dawn and her family and friends raised $5,500 … bringing them to cumulative total of $16,000 since 2013! How does she do it?… read more Read More

From Baltimore to India: Visiting Nurse Notes with Alpa Uchil, M.P.H., R.N.

How are we preparing the next generation of nurses to care for the growing population of people with Parkinson’s? The alumni of The Edmond J. Safra Visiting Nurse Faculty Program (EJS-VNF) at PDF are doing their part. Alumni of the program, such as Alpa Uchil, M.P.H., R.N., a nurse at The Johns Hopkins University (JHU) School of Medicine, undergo the “train the trainer” curriculum, so that they can, in turn, educate their nursing students. We sat down with Ms. Uchil, who completed the program in 2014, to understand her work in Parkinson’s and how the EJS-VNF program has made an impact. She’s… read more Read More