Monthly Archives: October 2016

The More Genes, the Better: How Diversity is Advancing Genetics Research

One day, we hope to offer treatments tailored to the individual needs of each person with Parkinson’s. But how can we do that if we don’t understand how genetics impact Parkinson’s? After all, our genes are part of what make us unique, including how they relate to our health. This issue came up last week in Nature, when a group of researchers released findings from research in which they analyzed 2,500 genetic studies conducted in 2016 that studied the genes of more than 35 million people. They compared this to a similar analysis from 2009. They found that in 2016, the… read more Read More

The Nobel Prize and PD Research: What It Means

PDF is excited to tell you that this week’s announcement of the Nobel Prize in Medicine – awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi, Ph.D., of the Tokyo Institute of Technology – has intriguing implications for Parkinson’s research. Dr. Ohsumi received the Nobel Prize for his work to understand autophagy – the way our body’s cells recycle and dispose of waste to stay healthy. About 15 years ago, a PDF-funded research team recognized the importance of Dr. Ohsumi’s groundbreaking discoveries and applied them to Parkinson’s. Since then and continuing today, PDF scientists have been unraveling the role autophagy plays in Parkinson’s. Dr. Ohsumi’s work was… read more Read More

I Voted: Stories from the Community Choice Research Awards

“I used to be a ‘do-er.’ Now I’m a ‘half do-er.’” These are the words Kris Gjerde, a PDF Advocate from St. Paul, MN, used to explain why she voted for apathy in the Third PDF Community Choice Research Awards survey.  She wants solutions so she can keep doing the things she loves. Since the survey launched earlier this month, she and more than 500 people with Parkinson’s and care partners have voted for their research priorities, ranging from sleep issues and anxiety, to gait difficulties and dyskinesia. Why is Kris’ feedback — and yours — so important?